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​Welcome to the Department of Bioengineering at the University of California, Berkeley where we pursue research and educational programs that open new areas of scientific inquiry, drive transformational technologies, and foster a community that trains and motivates the next generation of bioengineers.​

Bio-Tech Connect: Networking with Industry

bio tech connect

Bio-Tech Connect: Networking with Industry

The top talent of UC Berkeley and local biotech employers at the largest biomedical industry event on campus.

February 22, 3:30 - 6:00 PM
Stanley Hall Atrium

Meet representatives from local biotech companies, large and small! All majors and levels welcome - early undergrad to PhD. RSVP here!

Our next seminar:

  • “Understanding and Programming Multicellular Patterning from the Bottom Up”

    February 28, 2018, 12–1 p.m.

    Stanley Hall

    Pulin Li, California Institute of Technology

    How genes, operating in individual cells, generate coordinated multicellular behavior is a fundamental question in biology. In every cell, a set of genes ('genetic circuits') interact with one another to control specific cellular functions, and combinations of these functional modules create population-level behavior, ranging from biological patterns to physiological rhythms. Applying a bottom-up...

ingber_web

ingber

2018 UC Berkeley Distinguished Lecture in Bioengineering

Donald E. Ingber
Harvard University

Wednesday, Feb 21, 3:30 PM, in 105 Stanley Hall
Biologically Inspired Engineering: From Mechanotherapeutics to Human Organs-on-Chips

Recent news from Berkeley Bioengineering

What good is CRISPR if it can’t get where it needs to go?

What good is CRISPR if it can’t get where it needs to go?

BioE startup GenEdit is featured in Wired as the first company devoted solely to Crispr delivery.

First Hacking for Impact Class Buzzes Around the Mosquito Problem

First Hacking for Impact Class Buzzes Around the Mosquito Problem

IEEE Spectrum talks with Professor Amy Herr, founder of Berkeley’s Hacking for Impact course, about the non-technical challenges of pursuing impact.

Alumna Lee-Karlon elected to AIMBE

Alumna Lee-Karlon elected to AIMBE

BioE undergrad alumna Ann Lee-Karlon, later a PhD graduate of UC San Diego, has been elected to the AIMBE College of Fellows Class of 2018. She was recognized for “outstanding leadership in successful drug development and business operations in Genentech and for enhancing diversity of future BME leaders.”

I’m a Bioengineer

Supada Sritanyaratana

Supada Sritanyaratana

Clinical Demand and Supply Leader, Genentech
BS Bioengineering, 2013

I predict how much medicine we need to produce to ensure that we have enough medicine for the patients in our clinical trials. Currently, I am managing the global supply of a new Alzheimer’s drug and a Macular Degeneration (blindness) drug.

“When I’m faced with a new problem, I take a step back to brainstorm multiple possible solutions from different perspectives ..to choose the solution that makes sense for the greater whole by empathizing with all of the stakeholders.”

Chian Gong

Chian Gong

Investor, Reach Capital
B.S. Bioengineering, Minor IEOR, 2009
MBA Wharton, 2015, MPA Harvard Kennedy School, 2016

I’m an early-stage investor in education technology companies. I spend my time meeting with entrepreneurs, evaluating potential investments, and supporting our portfolio companies with everything from recruiting to product strategy.

“I’m very thankful for the analytical and problem solving skills that were an integral part of the Bioengineering program. One specific course that deeply shaped my career was the Capstone course with Professor Amy Herr.”

Upcoming events:

  • Dr. Mingfu Shao, Department of Computational Biology, Carnegie Mellon University

    February 26, 2018, 4–5 p.m.

    Soda Hall

    Title: Abstract: I will present modeling and algorithmic designs for two challenging problems in biology and argue that efficient computational methods enable significant advances in our understanding of cell machinery and genome evolution. The first problem is the assembly of full-length transcripts -- the collection of expressed gene products in cells -- from noisy and highly...

  • UROC DeCal – Demystifying the Research Process: Decolonizing Methods in Academic Research (Hosted by UROC: Undergraduate Researchers of Color)

    February 26, 2018, 6–8 p.m.

    Barrows Hall

    Istifaa Ahmed, UROOC

    Ethnic Studies 98/198 Class Time: Mondays, 6pm-8pm, 1/22/18 - 4/30/18 Course Control Number (CCN): 24251 Units: 1-3 units Student Instructor: Istifaa Ahmed Welcome to our student-led organization and DeCal, Underrepresented Researchers of Color (UROC) – Demystifying the Research Process: Decolonizing Methods in Academic Research! We seek to build a community of researchers of color...

  • “Understanding and Programming Multicellular Patterning from the Bottom Up”

    February 28, 2018, 12–1 p.m.

    Stanley Hall

    Pulin Li, California Institute of Technology

    How genes, operating in individual cells, generate coordinated multicellular behavior is a fundamental question in biology. In every cell, a set of genes ('genetic circuits') interact with one another to control specific cellular functions, and combinations of these functional modules create population-level behavior, ranging from biological patterns to physiological rhythms. Applying a bottom-up...

  • “Engineering Biology to Make Novel Medicines”

    March 2, 2018, 12–1 p.m.

    Sibley Auditorium, Bechtel Engineering Center

    César de la Fuente-Nunez, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    Proteins perform the cellular tasks required for life. The great variety of their biological activity is due in part to their vast combinatorial space: 20n, n being the number of amino acids present in any given peptide chain and 20 being the number of natural amino acid monomer building blocks. Yet we do not have the tools to properly engineer these diverse molecules. One approach is to start...

UC Berkeley Department of Bioengineering